Charles Taylor’s Sources of the Self has been out for fourteen years now and is being cited as “magisterial.” It is nothing less than a review of the whole history of Western philosophy on its central point. Art became a process of expressing—of making manifest—our hidden nature and, by so doing, creating and completing the discovery within the artistic expression. Following the expressivist turn, Taylor notes, "The moral or spiritual order of things must come to us indexed to a personal vision" (p. 428). In modern psychology the notion of the self has replaced earlier conceptions of the soul. A belief in deism emerged, though never uncontested—namely, that miracles and revelation were not required as a proof of God's existence. Following Rousseau, to understand the self was not simply to describe what was evident in a reflexive analysis of the mind, but a task of discovering and bringing to light what was hidden within. However, in a universe where humans exist, there is a human form of life. In Homeric times, a central constitutive good was the warrior ethic. Taylor thinks the projectionist thesis is more coherent than the reductionist thesis. Order now. Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity, (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 30. The following is a brief outline of some of the moral sources that Taylor discussed. Our moral frameworks exist, no matter how fleetingly or diversely. Rogers, C. (1959). Whereas Locke had seen the cosmos in terms of interlocking purposes that could be grasped by disengaged reason, the expressivism that followed Rousseau saw a natural, yet not exoterically available, source of life that could be shaped and given a real form through human expression. Morse, S. J. "[5] The constitutive good—whether it be a belief in reason over desire, the inherent benevolence of the natural world, or the intuitively benign nature of human sentiment—orients us towards the evaluations that we make and the goods we aspire towards. Experience of the world was constituted by simple ideas given by sensual impressions. Moral evaluations have become mediated by the imagination. The major insight of Sources of the Self is that modern subjectivity, in all its epistemological, aesthetic, and political ramifications, has its roots in ideas of human good. Then there is disagreement between the Romantics and the modernists on morality, whether an aesthetic life could be spontaneously moral, or whether "the highest spiritual ideals threaten to lay the most crushing burdens on mankind. The major insight of Sources of the Self is that modern subjectivity, in all its epistemological, aesthetic, and political ramifications, has its roots in ideas of human good. Moreover, he noted, such a historical investigation might presuppose an idealist form of history in which history is shaped by the evolving ideas and ideologies of different times. • Fernando Andacht, Mariela Michel, A Semiotic Reflection on Selfinterpretation and Identity 'Most of us are still groping for answers about what makes life worth living, or what confers meaning on individual lives', writes Charles Taylor in Sources of the Self. Pre-order How to Avoid a Climate Disaster now with Pre-order Price Guarantee. Sources of the Self: | | Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity | | ... World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive collection ever assembled. He positions his thesis in contrast to the naturalist understanding of human life, and first considers a reductive naturalism that holds that all human activity, and hence all human values, can be reduced to laws of nature—laws of nature that preclude qualitative distinctions among moral goods. Taylor's approach is historical and interpretative; he aims to explain how it is that the dominant aims and values of modernity, concerns related to interiority, or a subjectivity, ordinary life (i.e., commerce, the nuclear family, etc), and the importance of the natural world can be seen to be compelling, to articulate goods that are … Taylor argues that within a deist order, the road to salvation was no longer determined simply by a person's position in the world and his or her actions, but also the manner in which one lives one's life—"worshipfully" according to Protestants or "rationally" according to Locke. Rather, people engaged in society through the use of a practical wisdom that discerned the goods an individual should strive towards. To provide the best account of human life, the identity that orients each of us towards particular kinds of activity and social understandings must be accounted for. Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich, Rezension aus dem Vereinigten Königreich vom 5. [4] Of course, understanding moral values as intrinsic to the human form of life does not bestow a singular, correct valuation to a particular cultural community or attribute a particular moral framework with universal-truth status. Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity[1] is a work of philosophy by Charles Taylor, published in 1989 by Harvard University Press. 'Most of us are still groping for answers about what makes life worth living, or what confers meaning on individual lives', writes Charles Taylor in Sources of the Self. Augustine had encountered the philosophy of Plato and was deeply influenced by Plato's ideas. Taylor argues that as the scientific revolution exemplified in the work of Nicolaus Copernicus and Sir Isaac Newton took hold in Western civilization, a shift occurred in the hierarchical evaluations placed on many life goods. Charles Taylor's latest book sets out to define the modern identity by tracing its genesis, analysing the writings of such thinkers as Augustine, Descartes, Montaigne, Luther, and many others. This approach, Taylor suggests, would allow for the sense of the dignity of human life, and the plurality of goods that constitute a good life. Charles Taylor's latest book sets out to define the modern identity by tracing its genesis. The major insight of Sources of the Self is that modern subjectivity, in all its epistemological, aesthetic, and political ramifications, has its roots in ideas of human good. For Locke, understanding the world and mankind’s place in the world depended on the sense impressions that our senses provided. FYI, the edition in the photo is not the one received. After first arguing that contemporary philosophers have ignored how self and good connect, the author defines the modern identity by describing its genesis. How has selfhood changed over time? Such an investigation would demand a breadth of scope involving social, economic, political, structural, and philosophical change (to name but a few aspects) that would not be possible within his work. Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity is a work of philosophy by Charles Taylor, published in 1989 by Harvard University Press. The mind was immaterial and rational. The answer could no longer be through revelation, nor was it manifest in a mechanistic world. Within a deist order, the question arose as to how one chooses the manner in which to lead one's life and why one would value a rational or worshipful manner of living. Moreover, all such moral frameworks are no more than passing modes of interpretation that have no true bearing on man's existence. However, unlike Descartes, whose understanding of the mental depended on an inward reasoning that was autonomous from the surrounding world, Locke rejected the possibility of innate ideas. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 16, 148-156. Taylor responds to this objection by discussing identity. add The News to homescreen. . Edition (30. Wählen Sie ein Land/eine Region für Ihren Einkauf. Other points: he has nothing to say about the rise of extremist modernist 'communitarian' (can't off-hand think of a better word) ideologies such as Fascism and Communism, which clearly have contributed to concepts of self in the last 100 years or so (he may like Baudelaire more, but communism and fascism are a bigger historical deal than Baudelaire and don't look to be going away - who reads Baudelaire these days?). In response to reductive naturalism, Taylor first notes the ad hominem argument that those who espouse some form of reductive naturalism nonetheless make, and cannot avoid but to make, qualitative distinctions as to the goods by which they live their lives. However, he followed the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein by noting that humans occupy a form of life. By constitutive good, Taylor refers to a good "the love of which empowers us to do and be good. Within the radical reflexivity of Descartes and Locke, there had been a vision of a rational, calculable, and manipulable self. Psychological Bulletin, 82, 213–225. Wir verwenden Cookies und ähnliche Tools, um Ihr Einkaufserlebnis zu verbessern, um unsere Dienste anzubieten, um zu verstehen, wie die Kunden unsere Dienste nutzen, damit wir Verbesserungen vornehmen können, und um Werbung anzuzeigen, einschließlich interessenbezogener Werbung. [(Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity)] [Author: Charles Taylor] published on (July, 1992) | | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. And yet, the projectionist will argue, there is no resolution to the conflict, because there are no universal criteria for resolving the subjective beliefs of different cultural communities. The warrior ethic had remained in the valuation placed on many life goods and still remains today. His effort to uncover and map our moral sources leads to novel interpretations … The second moral axis refers to beliefs about the kind of life that is worth living, beliefs that permeate our choices and actions in our day to day existence. ( 全部 6 条) 热门 / 最新 / 好友 / 只看本版本的评论 能工巧匠沙门哥 2006-12-22 11:25:57 译林出版社2001版 Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity. The mind itself had become a mechanism that constructed and organized understandings through the building blocks of simple ideas. If the Amazon.com.au price decreases between your order time and the end of the day of the release date, you'll receive the lowest price. After first arguing that contemporary philosophers have ignored how self and good connect, the author defines the modern identity by describing its genesis. The modern turn inwards is far from being a disastrous rejection of rationality, as its critics contend, but has at its heart what Taylor calls the affirmation of ordinary life. Releases February 16, 2021. "[8] But there is disagreement about moral sources that support the agreement. Aristotle differed from Plato in that he did not see all order as unchanging and cosmic. takes Catholicism as normative. The major insight of Sources of the Self is that modern subjectivity, in all its epistemological, aesthetic, and political ramifications, has its roots in ideas of human good. For utilitarians and also followers of Kant, provide an answer to these questions in terms of how we calculate the outcome of our acts and (for Kantians) the motives behind our actions. Taylor articulates these moral frameworks in terms of three axes. Taylor illuminates and emphasizes the moral framework for our values because he feels it is invisible to many in contemporary society. Not convinced that it works as a _philosophical_ argument though - got to agree with Bernard Williams who says that the problem is that in the end, it unconsciously (?) "[9], Taylor criticizes the critics as too narrow, and too blind. Rather, the qualitative distinctions that the reductive naturalist, or anyone else, makes are constitutive of that person's identity; an identity that involves one's understandings of self as a person within a particular family, religion, profession, nation and so on. Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity is a work of philosophy by Charles Taylor, published in 1989 by Harvard University Press. November 1989, Vorherige Seite verwandter Gesponserter Produkte, Nächste Seite verwandter Gesponserter Produkte, Cambridge University Press; 1. Understanding the world, our place in the world and the power of God depended on a rational objectification of the material world and a reflexive mental turn in which an individual came to see the mind as a mental, immaterial object that was autonomous from the material mechanistic world. After first arguing that contemporary philosophers have ignored how self and good connect, the author defines the modern identity by describing its genesis. Many followers of Immanuel Kant also depend on a rational formula for moral action. Also, while he talks a lot and interestingly about the influence of Augustine, he never talks about Augustine's development of the concept of original sin (t.b.h I get the strong impression that, as a Catholic, he simply doesn't see this going by), which surely had an fundamental, redefining, effect on the European understanding of self - I would really have liked to read him thinking through this explicitly. Opponents of technology often forget how it was disengaged reason that proposed freedom, individual rights, and the affirmation of ordinary life.